Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3
1
Winter 2020 sings / November 21st - Big Neil's Zoom sing!
« Last post by Frazer on November 21, 2020, 07:48:08 pm »
2
Books and recordings / Village Carols recordings
« Last post by Frazer on November 21, 2020, 01:14:43 am »
There's a great thread going on over in Neil's Village Carols Facebook Group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/VillageCarols/), about recordings of the carols.  I thought it might be useful to compile a list of Ian Russell's Village Carols recordings - some are still available from http://www.villagecarols.org.uk/publications/index.html - Ian's paper "Working with tradition" was very useful for dates etc.

VC001 - "A Song for the Time" Ecclesfield: 48pp book + 60 minute cassette (1987)
VC002 - "Arise, Rejoice and Sing!" Worrall: 56pp book + 90 minute cassette (1988)
VC003 - "While Shepherds Watched" Ingbirchworth: 40pp book + 60 minute cassette (1988)
VC004 - "The Bells of Paradise" Castleton: 48pp book + 60 minute cassette (1990)
VC005 - "Peace O'er the World" Hathersage: 48pp book + 60 minute cassette (1992)
VC006 - "To Celebrate Christmas" Oughtibridge: 44pp book + 80 minute cassette (1993)
VC007 - "On This Delightful Morn" Foolow: 48pp book + 59 minute cassette, reissued on CD (1994, http://www.villagecarols.org.uk/publications/on-this-delightful-morn.html)
VC008 - "Come Sing for the Season" Coal Aston: 48pp book + 36 minute cassette (1995)
VC009 - "Hark, Hark! What News!" Dungworth: 52pp book + 79 minute cassette/CD (1996, http://www.villagecarols.org.uk/publications/hark-what-news.html)
VC010 - "Brightest and Best" Beeston: 48pp book + 49 minute cassette/CD (1997, http://www.villagecarols.org.uk/publications/brightest-and-best.html)

VC011 - "Break Forth in Song" Worrall: 78 minute CD (2009, CD only - Worrall booklet from VC002 made available for download)

VCF01 - 1994 Festival CD (75 min)
VCF02 - 1996 Festival CD (69 min, http://www.villagecarols.org.uk/publications/festival-cd.html)
VCF03 - 2002-2014 Festival compilation double CD (145 min) "The Theme, the Song, the Joy" (http://www.villagecarols.org.uk/publications/the-theme-the-song-the-joy.html)

SFW CD 40476 "English Village Carols" (71 min) (1999, http://www.villagecarols.org.uk/publications/english-village-carols.html)
3
Winter 2020 sings / Re: November 14th - Big Neil's Zoom Sing
« Last post by Frazer on November 15, 2020, 10:34:00 pm »
Another scheduled for Saturday 21st (see https://www.facebook.com/groups/VillageCarols/ again for more details).
4
Winter 2020 sings / Re: November 14th - Big Neil's Zoom Sing
« Last post by Frazer on November 14, 2020, 07:33:25 pm »
On now!
5
Winter 2020 sings / Re: Sings - Winter 2020
« Last post by Frazer on November 14, 2020, 07:32:19 pm »
Up to 10 now....  perhaps the winter won't be quite so bereft of singing after all!
6
Winter 2020 sings / November 14th - Big Neil's Zoom Sing
« Last post by Frazer on November 14, 2020, 07:25:17 pm »
Starts 8pm (Zoom opens at 7.30pm) - see https://www.facebook.com/groups/VillageCarols/ for details of joining.  See you there!
7
Technology - singing online / Editing audio
« Last post by Frazer on November 01, 2020, 10:49:14 pm »
If you have a recording of a sing, you may find that you want to edit it.  Audacity (https://www.audacityteam.org/) is the standard tool for this; I've used it for a handful of projects and have always found web pages which help me do what I wanted.

If it's just a question of splitting one long track into individual pieces, mp3directcut (https://mpesch3.de/) is very simple.

Remember that whenever you edit either audio or video, back up the original first!
8
Technology - singing online / Watching videos simultaneously
« Last post by Frazer on November 01, 2020, 10:40:30 pm »
Given a video to play at a Zoom session which is on YouTube, it is possible for many people to watch it simultaneously.

One could simply share this video in a Zoom session, pausing for a chat between carols.  This is simplest, but sharing a video this way can run into bandwidth issues.

Alternatively, another way to run a virtual sing would be via the Watch2Gether site (https://w2g.tv/?lang=en).  The host would set up the room (instructions at the bottom right of the page), and could play through the tracks, pausing at certain points for a chat.  Viewers could switch between the Zoom window and the Watch2Gether window; the host can direct everyone to the right window.  (We've done this successfully at the University to play videos to groups of students - the advantage of doing it this way is that the video quality is the same as the original upload.)
9
Technology - singing online / YouTube videos - audio tracks plus words
« Last post by Frazer on November 01, 2020, 10:38:00 pm »
I made some videos of the 1994 Harvest Sing, at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4OfyPuCfeeU&list=PLiLNH23i0hmpzvoBbcQU7uQlKrwV_rrqv

Perhaps it's worth making a post on how I made these videos, in case others might be interested for Christmas sings (I'm willing to make a few of these for this winter too, although I have quite a bit of work to do as well!).

1. Get the audio.  Ian Russell has a lot of recordings made over the years, and may be willing to help with providing some.
2. Get the words.  Ian's site has quite a few words - see http://www.villagecarols.org.uk/carol-indexes/index.html - you may need to edit some depending on your own local traditions!
3. Make into a document, with one carol per page (I used Word for this, but no doubt there are alternatives).
4. Make images of the relevant parts of each page (I used the Windows Snipping Tool to make these screenshots, but I'm sure there are others)
5. Get any other images you might want - photos of the pub, soloists, singers, Christmas scenes etc.
6. Armed with the audio and all the images, you can now make a video.  There are quite a few free video editors out there - I used kdenlive (https://kdenlive.org/en/) for this. Put the audio track in the first audio layer (or in both, if you have a stereo recording, I guess).  Then add images to the relevant parts of the track, and stretch out the ends so that the image starts and ends at the correct points of the audio track.

Then render the video.  There are instructional videos online for using kdenlive (and presumably the alternatives as well), but I found it very intuitive.

To upload to YouTube, you will need to make an account.  This is straightforward.  To be able to upload videos longer than 15 minutes, the account will need to be registered/confirmed (I forget the word they use).  Uploading is painless with a decent internet connection, but can be frustrating without.
10
Technology - singing online / Zoom
« Last post by Frazer on November 01, 2020, 10:02:39 pm »
I'm hoping others will add to this thread with any practical tips about using Zoom.  I've never done it!
Pages: [1] 2 3